NewSchools Venture Fund released "Unrealized Impact," a study on diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) in the education sector.

Since 2001, 2.8 million more students have graduated from high school rather than dropping out. In an economy that prizes educational attainment more than ever before, these rising rates have created enormous benefits for individuals, communities and our entire nation. But even now with the current national graduation rate at 83.2 percent, it is becoming more evident that the nation will be unable to meet its high school graduation rate goal without intensifying efforts to reach the students who have historically faced the greatest challenges.  The country remains off-pace to reaching its goal for the second year in a row.

Education is often touted as a means of “balancing the playing field” and stimulating socio-economic mobility. However, lower educational attainment levels among most racial minorities in the U.S. have been the norm since college attendance expanded into the middle class following WWII. While college attendance has increased for Hispanics and African Americans in the past couple decades, it still trails that of non-Hispanic Whites.

Multiple adversities, the research shows, put young people at increased risk of performing poorly in school or dropping out.

El Poder En Ti, NBCUniversal Telemundo Enterprises’ robust community initiative aimed at empowering viewers to take action for a better life, announced the El Poder En Ti “Tu Educación Scholarships,” which recognize and celebrate academic excellence, leadership skills, and the pursuit of higher education.

Native-born children of a foreign-born parent, also known as the second generation, were more likely to be college-educated and have higher incomes than their parents’ generation, according to a first-ever report from the U.S. Census Bureau.

In today’s digital world, parents overwhelmingly agree it is important to nurture good character in their children, including traits like honesty and compassion.

Univision Communications Inc. (UCI) unveiled five new Univision Media Centers at middle schools in Austin, Chicago, Miami, Los Angeles and Oakland.

New York Women in Communications, Inc. has announced the awardee of its Esperanza Scholarship, sponsored by d expósito & Partners, LLC, the New York-based Hispanic advertising and marketing agency.

A large majority of Americans seek extra knowledge for personal and work-related reasons. Digital technology plays a notable role in these knowledge pursuits, but place-based learning remains vital to many and differences in education and income are a hallmark of people’s learning activities

The percentage of Asians in the U.S. with a bachelor's degree or higher rose to 54 percent in 2015, up from 38 percent in 1995, according to a new report from the U.S. Census Bureau. In addition, Asians and non-Hispanic whites were more likely to hold a bachelor's degree or higher when compared with blacks and Hispanics.

Hispanic and black parents place high value on a college degreeToday, 86% of Hispanic parents and 79% of black parents with children under 18 say it is either extremely or very important that their children earn a college degree. By comparison, about two-thirds (67%) of white parents say the sam

The first of several Univision Media Centers planned for middle schools in the U.S., this first of its kind facility will provide students with the tools and training to understand how a media newsroom operates.

The Hispanic Scholarship Fund (HSF) announced the election of Lisa Garcia Quiroz, Senior Vice President, Time Warner Inc., and President, Time Warner Foundation, as the Chair of the Board of Directors

The Smithsonian's National Museum of American History is launching a multiyear collecting initiative, "Latinos and Baseball: In the Barrios and the Big Leagues," to identify artifacts that reflect the social and cultural influence of the game on Latino communities.

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