Often overshadowed by their male counterparts in Peruvian culture, these talented women are deserving of the spotlight. The women — vocalists, Araceli Poma, Rosa Guzmán, Charo Goyoneche, Sofía Buitrón, Maricarmen Padilla, Milagros Guerrero, Victoria Villalobos, percussionists, Catalina Robles and Gisella Giurfa — aspire to a future free of racism and sexism in Peru.

In the first half of 2020, revenues from Latin music in the U.S. grew 18.6% to $296.1 million at retail value, the fourth consecutive year of double digit percentage growth. Latin music continued to grow its share of overall U.S. music revenues to 5.2%.

The Recording Industry Association of America and its members announced a new multimedia campaign recognizing and celebrating Hispanic artists, their music, and the genre’s overall impact on U.S. society and culture.

Music videos began airing first on cable TV in 1981, eventually becoming a driving force in popular culture and delivering some of the larger cable audiences. With the help of music videos' popularity, multichannel pay-TV services driven by cable would go on to demonstrate tremendous power for marketers trying to reach meaningful audiences and build brands through the first decade of the 21st century. They became a natural complement to broadcast TV and would eventually become a foundational component of media plans. Music videos were important to the growth of cable and pay-TV.

Uforia will kick off a weekly digital livestream series of unfiltered and unforgettably intimate at-home experiences with Latin music’s biggest stars starting May 6th at 8 p.m. ET with Manuel Turizo and host Jackie Guerrido

Music, one of the most prolific forms of cultural expression, influences consumer behavior and brand affinity. In this week’s episode, Nidia Serrano, Audience Marketing Director at Pandora, discusses how cultural cues impact trends in music marketing research, and how advertisers can use those insights to create relevant content for multicultural audiences.

“Where were you when Selena died?”  By Court Stroud

The Latin Recording Academy® has announced key changes to a leadership team that will continue to drive its remarkable and aggressive growth for the next decade. Changes in the Executive team include appointing former Azteca America President and CEO, Manuel Abud, as the new Chief Operating Officer of The Latin Academy while naming 19-year Latin GRAMMY® veteran Luis Dousdebes to the new position of Chief Awards, Membership and Preservation Officer. Additionally, Aida Scorza, who has served both the Recording Academy™ and The Latin Recording Academy for more than 30 years, has been promoted to Senior Vice President of Awards.

Haim Saban, Chairman of Saban Capital Group, announced he will invest $500 million into the music industry and partner with seasoned music executive Gustavo Lopez to lead Saban Music Group.

The Latin music market continued its remarkable transformation in the first half of 2018.  Revenues grew 15%, totaling $135 million while streaming represented a remarkable 91% of the entire market.  Latin music has become a worldwide phenomenon, driven by a diverse streaming market and Latin labels making smart investments to support their artists’ global ambitions.

Jerry González, the trumpet player, percussionist and world-known Latin Jazz legend, died in Madrid, Spain. He was 69.  González, of Puerto Rican background, was a product of New York’s El Barrio, the hub of New York’s Puerto Rican community, and the cradle of transformed Afro-Cuban rhythms that gave birth to Salsa music and new Latin Jazz forms.

The focus is on diversity in pop culture for Hispanic Heritage month. When it comes to pop culture, many Americans are welcoming of Spanish-language media, while roughly one-third say there should be more representation in the media

Global music streaming service Deezer has selected MARCA Miami to introduce its FLOW service to the US audience. MARCA is responsible for strategy development, creative and media planning and buying.

Produced by Telemundo and Somos Productions, the fourth annual “Latin AMAs” pays tribute to today’s most influential and iconic Latin artists, as voted by the fans in the tradition of the “American Music Awards,” the world’s largest fan-voted award show.

Music has long been a cultural connector for Latinx* consumers across all ages. This proclivity for music, combined with a preference for everything digital, has made music an important online activity—both personal and social—for Latinx consumers.

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