Bill Duggan penned a piece in MediaVillage.com last week continuing the ANA's attack on ad agencies -- this time over production transparency, which is the code name for unethical and possibly illegal bid-rigging activities conducted by some agencies to secure production contracts at favorable rates.  A previous transparency issue, media transparency, was investigated by ANA in 2016, and it confirmed instances of media agencies enriching themselves at client expense through rebates, kickbacks and other "non-transparent" practices, many of them not forbidden by existing contracts.  Duggan summarized ANA's view about these two transparency issues: "The advertising industry continues to suffer from a transparency crisis, which has broken down trust between advertisers and agencies ... the ad agency community now needs to acknowledge and address these issues rather than continuing to issue denials …"  By Michael Farmer

A year ago, the advertising industry was stirred by the ANA-commissioned report "An Independent Study of Media Transparency in the U.S. Advertising Industry" from K2 Intelligence.  The key finding of that report was that non-transparent business practices, including cash rebates to media agencies, are pervasive in the U.S. media ad buying ecosystem.  By Bill Duggan

On Monday, August 21, 2017, all of North America will experience an eclipse of the sun. The solar eclipse path of totality will stretch from Salem, Ore., to Charleston, S.

So a couple of weeks ago I sounded off about Facebook’s plans to enable sound automatically in its New Feed. I suspect my reaction is not that unusual and that advertisers still need to think about how their video is going to communicate without sound.  by Nigel Hollis

Non-transparent production practices exist at multiple ad agencies and agency holding companies, according to a new study by the ANA (Association of National Advertisers).

All brands have a story to tell consumers, but telling it in a way consumers want to hear can be challenging. Marketers are taking advantage of their ability to use content and ad creative sequentially to present longer, more compelling messages to consumers.

Erik DuPlessis sent me a link to this post titled 'The Wisdom of Taxi Drivers'  by Damon Stapleton. Thank you, Erik, like you said, “very, very good”. Why? Because it reminds us that the power of stories lies in being interesting, specific and human. It reminds us that we need to keep people – the target audience if you must – at the heart of the creative development process.  by Nigel Hollis

I'am not influenced by advertising. I make up my own mind what to buy’. How many times has one of your friends said this to you? Of course, they are 50 percent right and 50 percent wrong. They do make up their own minds but that decision is likely influenced by advertising along with a host of other forgotten contacts with the brand.  by Nigel Hollis

NBCUniversal Telemundo Enterprises and Mazda North American Operations (Mazda) announced a premier multimedia advertising campaign that will introduce the all-new Mazda CX-5 to U.S. Hispanic audiences through “¡Al Bate!” (Batter Up!) – an eight episode, documentary style mini-series featuring former MLB player Ramiro Peña, who currently serves as an infielder for the Hiroshima Toyo Carp of Nippon Professional Baseball.

Most people know that a can of Pepsi or Coke sitting on a kitchen table in a movie or TV show is product placement, an oh-so-subtle advertisement without words or action. The item is there to be noticed, even unconsciously, which may lead to a purchase or trip to the refrigerator. Until recent years, these indirect advertisements have been fairly simple. The practice dates back to the 1930's.

The agreement will further extend Ogilvy’s US Hispanic service offering and strengthen MARCA’s current capabilities in digital, social media, and analytics.

There was, for once, big news at the annual advertising festival in Cannes, France, but it had nothing to do with who won the grand prizes.  Er, um, pardonnez-moi, grand prix.  Ratherm the 2017 event -- formally, the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity -- will be remembered for a startling announcement midway through by Arthur Sadoun, the new Chairman and CEO of the giant Publicis Groupe agency company, that he was bidding adieu for the next year to Cannes Lions, along with other awards shows and events such as CES and South by Southwest.

Ad agencies and advertisers are victims of the belief that "creativity" is the basis of their current relationships, and that "more creativity" will give them more of what they need.  Ad agencies have promoted "creativity" since the days of Bill Bernbach, more than 50 years ago, when agencies were at the top of their game.  Advertisers, as their clients, continue to hire agencies for their perceived creativity, provided costs are rock bottom.  However, "creativity" is no longer delivering improved brand performance or increasing shareholder value.  The search for more creativity is making victims of agencies and CMOs alike -- neither lasts very long in a relationship.  It's time for a new paradigm.  The "Creative Paradigm" is out of date.  It's not working.  By Michael Farmer

A new study from YouAppi, a growth marketing platform for mobile brands, finds that when it comes to delivering effective mobile video, marketers face quite a few challenges. Among them are developing creative, as well as finding properties to effectively run mobile videos.

Pages