The major trade associations representing the advertising industry — are jointly writing to express opposition to the addition of the new census question that asks, “Is this person a citizen of the United States?”

With so many video options available today, it’s easy to get tunnel vision—especially when it comes to newer options like streaming and connected TV. But, despite the variety of devices and channels Americans now have to choose from, TV viewing remains their top media option.

Marketers want to follow customers in real time, but outdated technology often stands in their way.

The world has never been more connected, and U.S. audiences have never had as many options to access content as they do these days. In short, consumers in the U.S. seem like they can’t get enough content, and the possibilities for marketers to reach them, while fragmented, is an opportunity that is just too good to pass on.

According to some data brokers, I’m a married woman in her mid-50s with a master’s degree earning enough money to make a solid down payment on a nice townhouse in New York City. Ad buyers who purchase data blindly will be sad to find out that I’m not a fancy lady; I’m just a millennial dude who relies on ad tech swag for a third of my wardrobe.

The Department of Commerce, which has oversight of the 2020 census, has approved the addition of a new census question that asks, "Is this person a citizen of the United States?" ANA members are concerned that the addition of a citizenship question would depress response among both non-citizens and their families (even if family members are indeed citizens). That runs the risk of non-respondent bias by significantly undercounting immigrant, minority and low-income populations. As one ANA member stated: "I believe that undocumented people will not report their presence and therefore the census will be under-reported, therefore skewing data, messing up budgets and providing inaccurate reporting."  By Bill Duggan / ANA

As the first week of August approaches, retailers are focusing their promotions and expanding their offerings to capture the $27.5 billion families are expected to spend on new clothes, electronics, shoes and other supplies for their kids this back-to-school season. And with one in four kids belonging to Hispanic families, the U.S. Hispanic consumer is a critical driver of how families shop and spend.

After years of being in the doldrums, U.S. retail spending showed a significant uptick in the first quarter of 2018, and Hispanic communities are a key contributor, according to The NPD Group. 

This is the first release of the table package showing detailed occupation and education for people age 25 and older. The tables were created with statistics from the 2016 American Community Survey.

Strategic acquisitions can play a big role in corporate growth strategy. And recently, we’ve seen a number of them in the market research industry, especially in the panel sector. Since GfK Knowledge Network’s acquisition of Garcia Research’s Hispanic panel, Cada Cabeza, in 2010, there have been several large companies acquiring Hispanic panels to bolster their Hispanic sample offerings. Nielsen, Research Now, and most recently, Maru/Blue’s acquisition of the Hispanic panel, Tú Cuentas, just to name a few.  By Mario X. Carrasco

Recruiting enough workers to fill the hundreds of thousands of temporary positions needed to take the 2020 Census won’t be easy, given the current economic climate, but the Census Bureau is more than up to the challenge.

Do gendered social norms influence survey reports of “objective” economic outcomes? This paper compares the earnings reported for husbands and wives in the Current Population Survey with their “true” earnings from administrative income-tax records.

Millennials expect more from brands. From the shoes they wear to the coffee they Instagram, brand choices are increasingly used to project values in public and online, elevating the need for brands themselves to be value-conscious.

Across nearly all business verticals, marketers reported large shifts in how they evaluate, measure and budget across media channels. Our recently released Nielsen CMO Report 2018 sheds light on the strategic and organizational challenges CMOs face as they adapt to unprecedented change in the marketing landscape.

Setting your team up for success is tougher than ever. One reason is that, at many companies, the individual players aren’t using the same playbook. As a result, they’re working at cross purposes like the runners in Monty Python’s “100 Meter Dash for People With No Sense of Direction.”

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