As this blog nears the end of its existence I cannot help but reflect on the different themes that run through its 14 years of content – don’t worry, this is not another post about the importance of perceived difference to brand growth – however, it is a related subject: how often brand marketers get led astray by data.  by Nigel Hollis

As Americans continue to cope with the uncertainty of health risks, economic downturn and restrictions in day-to-day living caused by COVID-19 and intensified by flashpoint events highlighting systemic racism in the United States, nearly half (45%) say their brand preferences have changed. Close to three quarters (74%) said the recent protests against racial injustice have made it more important to support businesses that improve diversity and inclusion, according to new research by global communications consultancy Ketchum.

The State of Data is a recurring research initiative designed to help U.S. advertising, marketing, and media practitioners better understand how their peers are investing in and using audience data as a fundamental pillar of their customer acquisition and engagement efforts.

The 4A’s announced that the organization is challenging Nielsen’s decision to combine national in-home and out-of-home television viewership into a single data stream*.  This stream will be used in calculating ratings and inventory pricing at the start of the 2020-21 broadcast television season – and will also affect C3 and C7 ratings.  This decision will negatively impact both agencies and marketers and their ability to distinguish data streams to support pricing, analysis and audience understanding.

What is good for gender equality is good for the economy and society as well. The COVID-19 pandemic puts that truth into stark relief and raises critically important choices.

KPMG Automotive Leader Gary Silberg discusses new analysis from KPMG’s automotive team suggesting changes in commuting and shopping—more remote work and online shopping—could reduce total vehicle miles traveled (VMT) by as much as 270 billion miles.

The 2020 Census is dependent on gathering Census data.  This alone is a major impediment to be able to gather information from minority households that do not have Internet access in many states.  They boast that they have a 62% national response rate.

Hispanics made up more than half of total U.S. population growth from 2010 to 2019Hispanics have played a significant role in driving U.S. population growth over the past decade, though the group is not growing as quickly as it once did. From 2010 to 2019, the U.S. population increased by 18.9 million, and Hispanics accounted for more than half (52%) of this growth, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of new U.S. Census Bureau population estimates, the last before 2020 census figures are released.

Americans are spending less of their total listening time with YouTube in 2020, and YouTube as an audio-only source is reaching fewer Americans in 2020, according to two updated datasets from Edison Research.

You’ve done the segmentation studies. You’ve parsed the data. You’ve sliced and diced every bit of learning you could get about your target consumer. (Maybe you even came up with a catchy name for your cohort, like “Determined Doers” or “Moms on a Mission.”) Now you’ve got a perfect picture of one very speci c type of individual.  You understand their attitudes, their beliefs and their path to purchase. And you’re counting on these assumptions to inform every part of your digital marketing, from creative development and media placement to analytics and optimization.  There’s just one problem.

Failure is one of the most important sources of success – especially in times of Covid-19 – but only when companies allow their employees to experiment and adapt to changing customer needs. And fast feedback is necessary if companies are going to allow their employees the leeway to fail fast.  by Manfred Maier - Global Platform Solutions Lead Customer Experience at Kantar

You've heard it before and you’ll hear it again. Millennials have been a hot topic for years now, but why? In this episode, we look into the minds of Millennials as the first of them turn 40.  Learn what truly makes this generation different from the rest.

When was the last time you reconsidered your approach to consumer monitoring? Your usual methods of tracking consumer trends may work well under typical, everyday market conditions—but these are not everyday market conditions.

When it comes to Latinos, there is no shortage of audio consumption among our community. As we are about to see, the same is true for podcast listening. The irony, however, is in the shortage of resources available to the Latino podcasting market. This strong consumption — paired with a lack of research – merits a formal look into the podcast listening terrains of the Latino listening world. This is exactly one reason why we teamed up with leaders in the audio space to conduct a study that will provide insights into the podcast listeners and non-listeners of our often simplified, but truly complex, ethnic group.

Many factors come into play when choosing a market research vendor. Some of the most common are methodological expertise, pricing, and, most importantly, data quality. However, when a multicultural research need comes up, rarely do corporate researchers vet their vendor’s multicultural expertise. So, should it be a prerequisite for getting the job? Absolutely, and here’s why.

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