Millions of kids are heading back to school. Along with brand new school supplies and new outfits, the first day of school usually brings a new classroom instructor. The idea of a new teacher can be intimidating for some kids. However, what kids sometimes forget is that they, themselves, are teachers. In fact, kids aged 6-12 years old find themselves teaching their parents about all kinds of things including media and technology. We find this to be especially true if their parents are Baby Boomers or older Gen Xers.

Younger Americans—those ages 16-29—exhibit a fascinating mix of habits and preferences when it comes to reading, libraries, and technology. Almost all Americans under age 30 are online, and they are more likely than older patrons to use libraries’ computer and internet connections; however, they are also still closely bound to print, as three-quarters (75%) of younger Americans say they have read at least one book in print in the past year, compared with 64% of adults ages 30 and older.

As the demand for skilled workers continues to grow, a new report released by Lumina Foundation shows that the rate of college attainment is steadily improving across America. Unfortunately, the pace of progress is far too modest to meet future workforce needs. The report also finds massive and ongoing gaps in educational achievement – gaps tied to race, income and other socioeconomic factors – that must be addressed.

Did you know that 21% of US adults have at least one tattoo? In addition, 21% of Americans say they would go without sex for a whole year in order to maintain access to the Internet. Now I don't have a tattoo, but I am part of the 21% of Hispanics who have an associate degree or higher. And 21%... is not enough. By Eric Melchor

The 4A's kicked off its 40th summer of MAIP this week, which, each year, places more than 100 undergraduate and graduate students in paid, 10-week summer internships at 4A's member agencies.

A record seven-in-ten (69%) Hispanic high school graduates in the class of 2012 enrolled in college that fall, two percentage points higher than the rate (67%) among their white counterparts,1 according to a Pew Research Center analysis of new data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

While students around the country were studying for finals, students from the Center for Hispanic Marketing Communication (HMC) at Florida State University (FSU) were on an eight-hour drive from Tallahassee to Miami to attend this year's AHAA Thinking Under the Influence conference.

“Matt, will you write me a recommendation so  I can go to business school? I want to get my MBA,” my colleague Katie Bronnenkant asked me a few years ago.

“Why do you need an MBA? You work in media,” I said dismissively.

Florida State University's Center for Hispanic Marketing Communication is celebrating the first anniversary of its undergraduate and graduate Multicultural Marketing Communication Certificates.

The 8th edition of Knocking at the College Door: Projections of High School Graduates, released by the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE), indicates that the population of U.S. high school graduates is entering a period of modest decline after nearly two decades of sustained growth. In addition, the pool of future college students is rapidly growing more racially and ethnically diverse, putting pressure on policymakers and practitioners to address educational attainment gaps among many traditionally underrepresented populations.

Reading is foundational to learning and the information acquisition upon which people make decisions. For centuries, the capacity to read has been a benchmark of literacy and involvement in community life. In the 21st Century, across all types of U.S.

The National Hispanic University announced today that it has formed an advisory board composed of prominent leaders from across the country. The board will be chaired by the Hon. Henry Cisneros, former secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

The Latino Information Network at Rutgers ([email protected]) University launched a first-of-its-kind Latino-focused research center and digital think-tank. [email protected] will provide original research, analysis and commentary on cultural, social, educational, political and economic aspects affecting the Latino community.

Record shares of young adults are completing high school, going to college and finishing college, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of newly available census data. In 2012, for the first time ever, one-third of the nation’s 25- to 29-year-olds have completed at least a bachelor’s degree.

Kmart has announced the launch of the inaugural Latina Smart internship program. Five retail-minded Latina Smart interns will be selected to participate in a 10-week paid summer internship at Sears Holdings corporate headquarters in Hoffman Estates, Ill.

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