As the dust settles on the 2018 midterm elections, a few things have come into focus. One is that while this was maybe not a fully blue wave (depends on which historical perspective you use as a benchmark), the Democrats harnessed voter anger against the current administration into a solid win by capturing the House of Representatives for the first time in eight years.

Hispanic voters are poised to play a potentially pivotal role as to whether the Democrats or the Republicans control the US Congress after the midterm elections. Hispanic voters have grown as a percentage of the electorate, largely as a result of young Hispanic-Americans attaining voting age.

How much is spent on political advertising and how big a part of the mix is digital? In the latest episode of “Behind the Numbers,” we break down the numbers and dig into questions about Facebook, the role of messaging and whether brands are being dragged into the political arena.

According to SSG’s primary survey, 68% of Spanish Dominant Hispanics who can vote in Federal elections feel very to extremely confident that they will go out and vote in the November 2018 mid-term elections. Spanish Dominant Hispanics consider that Immigration, Racism, Homeland Security, Gun Control and Health Care are the top 5 issues facing the country. The ranking of these issues don’t change between Millennials and Xers/Boomers but the level of importance for Immigration and Health Care is significantly higher among Spanish Dominant Xers & Boomers. Interestingly, Racism is identical regardless of Generation

On Aug. 26, 1920, the U.S. Congress ratified the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, giving women the right to vote. Today, Susan B. Anthony and other suffrage leaders who fought for social equality 100 years ago would be proud to witness the fruits of their labor as women maintain a prominent position in determining election outcomes across our 50 states.  That hard-fought influence of the female voter is sure to be felt with the upcoming statewide gubernatorial, senate and house races taking place in almost every state this year.  But are all female voters alike, and will a one-size-fits-all media strategy work as candidates vie to get their messages heard by this important voter segment?

Most money raised in politics is spent on advertising, and believe it or not, even in this digital age, most of those advertising dollars still go to the long-time king of political advertising: television.

Investors have banged Twitter pretty hard of late. Criticized for flat user growth, the company’s stock has dropped as much as 13% during recent midday trading.  Despite this, users in Latin America have made the platform an integral part of their social media consumption habits.

New Ipsos research shows a clear path for brands to protect their reputations and avoid the political fray.

About half (54%) of Hispanics say they are confident about their place in America after Trump’s election while four-in-ten Hispanics (41%) say they have serious concerns about their place in America.

The report, titled “Ipsos Global @dvisory: Power to the People” is based on 16,597 recent interviews in 23 countries around the world. The report examines into the political mood around the world.

In a political bombshell still reverberating through Washington, Donald Trump, confounding the predictions of most of the pundits and pollsters, won a solid electoral victory. For the first time in eight years, the Republicans control the Presidency and the House and Senate. This means that it is likely that the political gridlock of the last three Congresses will be broken.

Burson Latino, Burson-Marsteller’s team dedicated to helping clients connect and engage with U.S. Hispanic population, has partnered with TINT, a social media marketing platform that connects brands and fans, to create www.latinovoicesandvotes.com, a bilingual social hub for Latino-focused news, content and online conversations in the last 100 hours of the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

A deep dive into the impact of politics on consumers, and the brands courting them.

This report provides an overview of our findings on the evolution of the U.S. economy, the state of U.S. competitiveness in 2016, and priorities for the next President and Congress, drawing on our research and the May–June 2016 surveys of alumni and the general public.  While a slow recovery is underway, fundamentally weak U.S. economic performance continues and is leaving many Americans behind. The federal government has made no meaningful progress on the critical policy steps to restore U.S. competitiveness in the last decade or more.  By Michael E. Porter, Jan W. Rivkin, Mihir A. Desai, With Manjari Raman

Whoever wins this election, major governmental changes that could significantly affect the advertising sector are almost certain to take place. A major turnover of personnel will occur in D.C. next year regardless of the election’s winner. One of the first jobs for the new President will be to nominate someone to fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court. Since many of the recent decisions supporting First Amendment protection for advertising have been 5-4 decisions, the newly appointed Justice could have a very large impact on our industry.  

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