Multicultural consumers comprise about 40% of the U.S. population and are important to brands searching for growth outside of saturated markets. Essential to penetrating this consumer group is understanding the nuances of it. Sample providers fulfilling census-representative sample requests or requests for multicultural sample, in general, must build out their panels to include multicultural perspectives from a broad spectrum of respondents across ethnicity, gender, income levels, and other factors. This ensures they obtain functional insights into the diversity of attitudes, interests, and lifestyles that define this multifaceted consumer.

Creative quality is the most efficient route to brand impact. So why is creative testing often excluded from brand tracking? Especially during COVID-19?

America is often described as a “melting pot” of different nationalities, ethnicities, and cultures. Much to the dismay of Teddy Roosevelt (who in a 1916 speech noted “There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism”), Americans have perfected naming each ethnic group within our borders distinctly, and those names have evolved.  By Mario Xavier Carrasco / ThinkNow

For many of us, our ideals and attitudes about who we are as individuals are shaped by our heritage and cultural experiences. As consumers, our affinity for certain brands pass through these filters resulting in purchase behaviors that tie back to our beliefs and how we see ourselves. Among multicultural audiences, this presents a unique challenge for marketers. There is no one size fits all solution to gaining buy-in from this diverse group. U.S. Hispanics hail from over 20 countries of origin, and Asian Americans, 40 countries. Understanding the importance of identity to multicultural audiences is essential to mitigating cultural bias in your marketing campaign strategy and delivering culturally relevant advertising.

The crisis has widened consumer appetite for choice and introduced unexpected shifts in consumer behavior—this year’s holiday shopping is up for grabs.

Missing their calls on two presidential elections have the pollsters scrambling to fix what went wrong. They need to consider whether their assumptions about the Americans they're surveying make sense anymore.

A new Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) Council report, which was produced in partnership with Precisely, has been released. The report is titled, How Covid Has Changed The Channels Of Engagement.

As the old saying goes, “If you do what you’ve always done, you’ll get what you’ve always gotten.” This is especially true in radio selling and buying, where a reliance on expensive ratings data and audience demos leads to buys made on the description of an audience rather than the actions of an audience.

Nothing illustrates Americans’ resilience quite like consumer spending. And after living alongside the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) for the past eight months, a majority of U.S. adults are ready to mask up, leave home and get back to a lifestyle that’s not hampered by crisis—albeit safely.

Radio’s weekly reach is now 97% of March’s numbers, as fall changes are driving more consumers to tune in. When examining AQH, which benefits from the Headphone Adjustment implemented with October 2020 measurement, listening grew 6% (4% can be attributed to the adjustment and 2% to organic growth).

Latino voters are less likely than all U.S. voters to say they are extremely motivated to vote in the upcoming presidential election, with the Latino electorate expressing less interest overall in the presidential campaigns, according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted Sept. 30-Oct. 5.
About half of Latino voters say they are ‘extremely motivated’ to vote for president in 2020

As the COVID-19 pandemic extends beyond seven months, the year-end holidays are next in line for disruption.

inZa Lab announced the release of its 2020 Gen Z Consumer Insights Report: How Gen Z Confronts Uncertainty. The report provides an in-depth look at how Generation Z (born between 1996-2010) has changed amidst the political, environmental, economic, and social turmoil of the past year.

Research from the Brennan Center for Justice and other advocacy organizations shows that Black Americans still have to confront unique barriers in order to cast their ballots. From reduced oversight of changes in voting laws to the ongoing threat of a global pandemic, Black voters have even more to contend with this election year. Despite historic obstacles and new challenges, Blacks take their right to vote seriously and have some of the highest rates of turnout in the country.

With the pandemic adding uncertainty for marketers, it’s more important than ever to understand the media landscape. Findings from Kantar’s inaugural Media Reactions 2020 study reveal that marketers lack the understanding and the data they think they need. Nearly half of marketers (48%) — a growing proportion — feel that they don’t have all the data they need to make decisions in their roles. The research also finds that two-thirds are worried about the future and think that an inability to track digital media via cookies will dramatically disrupt the industry — a situation that could further impede marketers’ ability to monitor advertising effectiveness.

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