America is responsible for nearly half (48%) of the world’s advertising spending. This is followed the closest by measured nations in Europe, which represent 30% of ad spending. Together, these two regions account for nearly 80% of Nielsen-estimated global advertising budget and are driving the most annual growth in these investments. You’d expect this wide reach to result in consumers addicted to the new products that surround them. But interestingly enough, compared to the rest of the world, consumers in these two regions are the least open to trying new things.

The average tenure for chief marketing officers of leading U.S. consumer brand companies decreased to 43 months from 44 months, according to the 15th annual CMO tenure study by leadership consulting firm Spencer Stuart.

It is very easy to think of brands as a fixed entity defined by a logo and a set of specific characteristics; however, because the real power of brands originates in people’s minds maybe we need to think about a brand as an evolving entity that morphs and changes over time. Our job as marketers is to shape that evolution to best grow sales.  by Nigel Hollis

Naming new brands is one of the most nettlesome marketing tasks. But now it's getting even more challenging, taking up additional bandwidth among time-strapped marketers.

The Culture Marketing Council: The Voice of Hispanic Marketing (CMC) announced its 2019 Hispanic Market Guide, the most comprehensive resource on the U.S. Hispanic market, is now available to download.

The future of the U.S. is multicultural, and has been trending that way for years. In fact, since 2010, 92 percent of the population growth in the U.S. has emanated from Hispanic, African-American and Asian population groups. In this episode of the Why Behind The Buy, Monique talks with multicultural marketing expert Cesar Melgoza about effective multicultural marketing. She also talks with Sonia Cisneros, manager of the Pacific Northwest region for Novamex, a food and drink distributor that is out front in marketing to multicultural consumers in the CPG space.

It’s increasingly clear that societal fragmentation is at least partly driven by fragmentation in personal identity. The acceleration of lifestage fluidity, the rising multiracial population, the expanding gender spectrum, and a plethora of other identity markers intersect uniquely for everyone. The emergence of microculturalism is a major test for businesses seeking to understand, reach, and accurately depict consumers.

Want to trigger impostor syndrome? Try this: Imagine being invited to a blind wine tasting. With a bunch of French wine buffs. You’ll have to guess each wine’s region and year and defend your position in an in-depth discussion. Sweaty palms yet?.  by Maren Seitz - Director, Global Connect Center - Kantar

We've heard it before: Don't treat your agencies as mere vendors, unless, of course, a commodity is what you are seeking. But the label "vendors" shouldn't be such a dirty word. In principle, "vendors" are delivering services that have reasonable commercial value and getting paid for them. The real issue is in such a competitive environment, relying on a "vendor" or transactional type of relationship to fuel your growth won't cut it anymore.

In the U.S. today, Latinx consumers are melding the physical and digital worlds to create personalized, culturally relevant shopping experiences on their own terms. These consumers’ paths-to-purchase, or consumer journeys, are social and circular. Purchase decisions can be frequently traced to the recommendation of a friend, family member or consumer review website. And, because Latinx consumers are so digitally connected—97% of Latinx households own a smartphone, and Latinx consumers spend over 27 weekly hours using apps and the web on smartphones—the consumer journey plays out in real-time. Brands that are not attuned to Latinx values and habits stand to miss out on this powerful market, which is reshaping the U.S. mainstream.

When I sit down with marketers who claim their multicultural marketing efforts didn’t work, I try to dissect the underlying reasons of this potential failure and curious enough, most marketers don’t even know these reasons themselves. In this article, I am focusing on my experience comparing what separates successful from unsuccessful multicultural marketing programs.  By Isaac Mizrahi - CCo-President of ALMA

I often assert that everything a company does builds its brand – advertently or inadvertently. But it is all too easy to get fixated on one aspect of brand building, whether it is customer experience, creating buzz or price promotion. Real marketing effectiveness requires finding the right balance of investment across three stages of the buyer life cycle.  by Nigel Hollis

Multicultural consumers comprise almost 40 percent of the total U.S. population, yet multicultural media investments make up only 5.2 percent of total advertising and marketing spending, according to a new study.

The legal distribution of marijuana at the state level has prompted many blue-chip companies to explore cannabis-based products.

Before it became involved in the media industry, procurement worked effectively in manufacturing and distribution, ferreting out non-value-added costs, improving processes, closing factories, investing in suppliers, and eliminating complexity. The result: improved quality and lower costs. Exactly the opposite has occurred in the media industry.

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