Lehman Brothers, Tyco, Enron, Worldcom, step aside!  Media agencies and their owners belong in the same lineup as Bernie Madoff, Dick Fuld, Dennis Kozlowski, Ken Lay, Jeffrey Skilling and Bernie Ebbers!  By Michael Farmer

Programmatic is certainly not going away, but I do think marketers are starting to smell it for what it really is.  It’s a cost-saving strategy, which attempts to create the same ROI for a fraction of the cost when compared to more “traditional” forms of advertising.  

Almost half of North American and European consumers surveyed by the Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) Council say they will abandon a brand and take their money elsewhere if they continuously encounter a poor, impersonal or frustrating customer experience across channels of engagement.

The GenForward Survey is the first of its kind—a nationally representative survey of over 1,750 young adults ages 18-34 conducted bimonthly that pays special attention to how race and ethnicity influence how young adults or Millennials experience and think about the world.

The issues raised in the subsequent transparency debate are complex, and if the allegations against the agencies are true, the behavior is reminiscent of past high-profile financial scandals.  By Bob Liodice and Doug Wood

Recent Valassis research indicates a continued desire to save, with 90 percent of U.S. shoppers reporting they use coupons, obtaining them from a variety of online and offline sources.

Are you thinking of promoting in Spanish but feel daunted by the complexities?  irect-to-consumer promotions in Spanish present challenges to the U.S. marketer -- scarcity of quality Spanish copywriters (as opposed to translators), misconceptions about Spanish "dialects," misinformation about the market, conflicting evidence about assimilation and preferred language, and so on.  By Daniel A. González

Currently, there are about 8.4 billion connected devices worldwide, up 31 percent from 2016 according to Gartner’s estimates. The consumer segment is the largest user base of these devices with 5.2 billion units being utilized in 2017. These devices represent 63 percent of the overall number of present applications. We can only expect these numbers to continue growing exponentially. These astonishing statistics show a radical shift in how consumers are receiving and transmitting data about themselves. However, with this technological advancement comes numerous privacy issues.

In a recent interview with Advertiser Perceptions, an organization that provides data-driven intelligence to marketers, I was asked, "Will the full-service agency model survive?"  As part of their survey, I was shown the results of how advertisers had thus far answered the question.  It was pretty close between those that said yes (42%) and those that said no (32%).  Twenty-six percent were not sure.

Last week saw an interesting piece by Mindshare's Global CEO Nick Emery published in Campaign and widely circulated on social media.  It generated much praise from beyond GroupM and WPP.  Andrew Stephens from the independent agency Goodstuff along with your humble correspondent were amongst many tweeting their appreciation of an insightful look at the many challenges facing media agencies and the need for new operating models.  Here are two key thoughts behind Nick's piece.

Reaching consumers is a constant challenge for marketers and advertisers competing in an increasingly noisy marketplace. However, consumer reaction to digital marketing suggests that some efforts may be doing more harm than good.

Go-to-market is a business-critical, highly complex and carefully sequenced process for global brands today. With companies spending some $1.5 trillion annually to promote their products, effectively managing the marketing supply chain ecosystem has become essential to brand performance and market success.

In 2012 a leading retailer began looking for a new chief marketing officer. The job description made the opening sound exciting: The new CMO would play a big, important role, leading the company’s efforts to boost revenues and profits. It seemed like the kind of opportunity any would-be CMO might desire.  By Kimberly A. Whitler and Neil Morgan

Most people know that a can of Pepsi or Coke sitting on a kitchen table in a movie or TV show is product placement, an oh-so-subtle advertisement without words or action. The item is there to be noticed, even unconsciously, which may lead to a purchase or trip to the refrigerator. Until recent years, these indirect advertisements have been fairly simple. The practice dates back to the 1930's.

A couple of weeks ago Mark Rabkin, VP, Core Ads at Facebook, posted ‘New Medium, New Rules: video in the mobile age’. It is a good summary of the challenges facing advertisers when it comes to engaging people in the mobile age and supports what Kantar Millward Brown has been saying for years: mobile is not a tiny TV.  by Nigel Hollis

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