In the past, TV advertising's value was obvious. Ask anyone "Where's the beef?" or "Can you hear me now?" and chances are they'll immediately associate those questions with Wendy's and Verizon. But in the digital-first world, TV's place in an omnichannel marketing strategy is shifting.

When a consumer finds a product they like—the perfect shade of red lipstick or a pair of shoes they can wear all day without a fuss—they tend to become repeat customers.

There's been a recent trend among many brands of moving their advertising in house, as first reported by the Association of National Advertisers in 2013. Many companies cite faster turnarounds and lower costs as top reasons to make the move. Although the popularity of going in house hasn't yet reversed, an increasing number of brands are realizing the choice isn't always cut and dry, and that bringing advertising in house isn't always as effective and efficient as they initially believed.

Is the "like" on social still enough? How about the share or impression? Those are the questions many brands are asking after years of being inundated with vanity metrics on the reach and impact of ad campaigns.

Working in advertising isn’t enough to prevent a person from becoming fed up with the ads they see.


Just when you think teens and young adults never look up from their screens, think again. Although every generation is using Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and new platforms that are developing on the daily, social media is not the only way! That’s right, face-to-face connections are here to stay.  By: CMC Research Chair Nancy Tellet

In theory the application of zero-based budgeting to marketing ought to be a good thing: no more budgets based on historical spending and funds allocated between options based on current performance. What is not to like? How about the fact that there is often a huge divide between theory and practice?  by Nigel Hollis

With major issues in the headlines affecting the multicultural community, there is no shortage of information sharing and social activism—both with in-person protests and social media fundraising. For example, according to the Washington Post, one in five Americans have protested in the streets or participated in political rallies since the beginning of 2016. Of those, 19 percent said they had never before joined a march or a political gathering.  By: CMC Research Chair Nancy Tellet

At a time when gaining new customers is a critical strategy for growth, it's important marketers understand why Hispanic consumers are a key segment looking for all kinds of product and service solutions.   Within this community, Latinas in particular have a huge influence on household purchases, so getting to know them better will be integral to developing a brand's strategic marketing plans.

This thought was prompted by a comment made by one of our clients. Usually when we talk about the benefits of developing a strong brand we focus on its potential to amplify gains, to sell more or to price higher; but what if the greatest benefit of a strong brand is to help a business survive setbacks?  by Nigel Hollis

In the latest episode of “Behind the Numbers,” eMarketer’s Eric Haggstrom and Chris Bendtsen discuss how traditional media is changing. Are people spending less time watching TV? Is radio staging a comeback?

Radio is America’s top weekly reach platform, both overall and with Black and Hispanic consumers—75 million of whom tune in each week. This Audio Today report profiles those audiences, their listening preferences, technology trends, and the unique value they offer to advertisers with a “sound strategy.”

  By Gonzalo López Martí - Creative director, etc/LMMiami.com

  • I guess everything that could be said about the Nikaepernick salvo has already been voiced, written and memed.
  • Want my personal opinion?
  • It was a genius marketing move.

In the era of “fast products” and digital disruption, delivering growth requires putting in place new predictive consumer-growth capabilities, including innovation, based on speed, agility, and scale.

The promise of digital marketing is very exciting: delivering the right message to the right person in the right place and at the right time. In marketers' quest for this holy grail, much attention and budget has been focused on the media side of the equation (i.e., the person, time, and place).

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