The United States has spent the past century expanding its economic power, and it shows in American families’ wealth. Despite income stagnation outside the circle of high earners, median family wealth grew from $83,000 in 1992 to $97,000 in 2016 (in 2016 dollars).

It’s increasingly clear that societal fragmentation is at least partly driven by fragmentation in personal identity. The acceleration of lifestage fluidity, the rising multiracial population, the expanding gender spectrum, and a plethora of other identity markers intersect uniquely for everyone. The emergence of microculturalism is a major test for businesses seeking to understand, reach, and accurately depict consumers.

Nearly a third of U.S. adults (31%) follow local news very closely, but local news does not play an equally vital role for all Americans. Older Americans, black adults and those with a high school education or less show considerably more interest in local news than their counterparts, according to a new analysis from Pew Research Center. These same groups prefer getting their local news via the TV rather than online.

Nielsen launched Continuous Diary Measurement (CDM) with the first data delivery in five of the 46 markets converting to monthly reports effective with the July 2019 survey.

In the U.S. today, Latinx consumers are melding the physical and digital worlds to create personalized, culturally relevant shopping experiences on their own terms. These consumers’ paths-to-purchase, or consumer journeys, are social and circular. Purchase decisions can be frequently traced to the recommendation of a friend, family member or consumer review website. And, because Latinx consumers are so digitally connected—97% of Latinx households own a smartphone, and Latinx consumers spend over 27 weekly hours using apps and the web on smartphones—the consumer journey plays out in real-time. Brands that are not attuned to Latinx values and habits stand to miss out on this powerful market, which is reshaping the U.S. mainstream.

Fuse Media unveiled findings of its new research study which shows that millennials - a group that many have considered to be “all about me” - is in fact the “We Generation.”

Radio specializes in boosting ad campaigns because it primarily reaches consumers during the day and away from home, when they’re on the go and closest to the point of purchase. This is a powerful advertising proposition, especially when you consider the impact of a captive audience in the car, where most of radio’s out-of-home listening happens. Increasing traffic and commute times aren’t likely to diminish anytime soon.

Straddling adolescence and adulthood, Gen Z is at a turning point. The oldest members of Gen Z have already graduated college and are now in their early 20s. Considered a thrifty generation, Gen Z has posed a challenge to key general merchandise industries, which have struggled to drive dollar growth among this cohort over the past two years.

In almost every purchase, search query or product use case, consumers power an ecosystem of personal data. Of course, their digital fingerprints help shape better product, retail and media experiences, but they also shine a light on the need consumers have for enhanced levels of trust in their transactions—trust in advertising, trust in pricing, trust in brand claims…the list goes on.

Evaluation through experiments is key to making sure the data we collect are of the highest quality and the most complete they can be.

Did you know that 29.1% of the total U.S. population - about 94.7 million people - lived in coastline counties in 2017? That's a 15.3% growth since 2000.

Emotions may seem complicated, but by better understanding their value and function we can learn how to harness their power to enhance relationships and improve well-being.

Despite the growing popularity of connected devices in the home, including smart devices, streaming media players, and smart TVs, a new report from The NPD Group reveals that 31 percent of U.S. households do not currently have a broadband connection (25Mbps per second download speed or greater). This equates to roughly 100 million consumers, totaling nearly one-third of the U.S. population, and the vast majority of these consumers are in rural markets.

This report details additional foundational research on modeling and segmentation conducted in support of the 2020 Census Integrated Partnership and Communications Program. Modeling efforts offer predictions of Census tract overall self-response rates, proportion of self-response on the internet, and timing of response.

Have you ever stopped to wonder how a company can accurately measure consumer behavior without knowing what every single person is doing? If so, you’re not alone. In fact, we see questions about this very topic all the time. After all, with more than 325 million people living in the U.S., it’s understandable that people might be skeptical about our ability to measure media engagement and shopping habits without checking in with each and every person in the country.

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